Street Art - Tokyo x London

Took the quickest route for a moment of brief escapism since google maps wouldn't load without internet access. Instead, I found myself skipping along these colourful lanes, which pretty much left my daydream swirling like milkshake with too many flavors.

These are some pictures of street art spotted in Tokyo and London from my previous visits. 

Shoreditch, London Work by Phlegm

Shoreditch, London

Work by Phlegm

Bricklane, London Work by Roa

Bricklane, London

Work by Roa

Bricklane, London Work by Marlark

Bricklane, London

Work by Marlark

Bricklane, London Portrait of an Indian man by Jimmy C

Bricklane, London

Portrait of an Indian man by Jimmy C

photo (11).JPG
Shoreditch, London Work by Stik

Shoreditch, London

Work by Stik

Harajuku Street, Tokyo

Harajuku Street, Tokyo

Harajuku JR, Tokyo

Harajuku JR, Tokyo

Harajuku Street, Tokyo  

Harajuku Street, Tokyo

 

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Shimokitazawa, Tokyo

Koenji, Tokyo

Koenji, Tokyo

Koenji, Tokyo

Koenji, Tokyo

Aoyama, Tokyo

Aoyama, Tokyo

What I love about street art is the pleasant surprise whenever you discover one. It is art that is accessible to everyone, art with a value in the society. Some stop you in your tracks to admire the beautiful paintings, while others might make you trip over dislodged manhole covers as you mull over their messages. Perhaps this is why Singapore is a graffiti free zone.

Drawing a comparison between street art in these two major cities, you can see their majorly distinct styles that echoes the subculture of the cities. While street art in London adopt a more socio-political tone, Tokyo street art borders on the eccentric with characters inspired by Japanese folklore and superstitions. Regardless of the styles that sets them apart, these accessible art forms provide a momentary change of scenery, adding life to a concrete city. Taking a different route to the supermarket to get eggs is now more exciting than ever. Or should I say... eggciting.

Looking through these pictures definitely piqued my interest in reading up more about the street art/graffiti culture. Having grown up in Singapore where self expression is being frowned upon, and graffiti art is considered taboo or illegal, the first question that pops into mind when I see this amazing street art is – "How do these people paint in the dark??" It is comforting to know that street art movement is so widely embraced in other parts of the world and with a place in certain societies, these artists don't have to paint in the dark. (hurrah!)

Of all the cities I've been to so far (not many unfortunately) I would say that London has the best street art scene. So if you are heading to London and you love street art, I suggest you bring your personal roll of 'Caution' tapes to cordon off the spots on the streets where you can plonk your tripods and cameras as the hip places can get pretty crowded. Street art can be found in various parts in London, not just the popular spots like Shoreditch or Brick Lane. This link could be useful, and a street art tour seems like it could be a fun thing to do. ☺ 

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My milkshake brings all the boys to the yard, and I'm like ...... excuse me you're damaging my astro turf.